There’s beauty in a life spent doing what you love, even if it doesn’t meet all the typical markers for “success.”

Could we have it both ways? Looks like it’s possible!

Have you found what you’re truly passionate about? Many of us haven’t, yet. We’re still going through every day waiting for that thing, whatever it may be, to and give us the motivation to dive in deep.

Today we’re featuring a group of individuals with a love for working with our Earth! It’s clear they have a little gift of insight for us.

Today on Ever Widening Circles (EWC), we’re taking a look into the lives of a few young people who are helping the United State’s Pacific Northwest stay away from industrial farms, and instead grow on the lands in a natural way, the same as generations before us have.

Farming, gardening, and living off the land may not be among your passions, but the way they look at the struggles they chose can expand us all in our own niches!

They’re doing what they are passionate about, and their work improves the lives of others who are even loosely connected to them. Now that sounds like a definition of finding meaning and success!

Let’s spend a few minutes with this short documentary, Age of the Farmer, created by filmmaker Spencer MacDonald of Half Magic Films. He spent weeks traveling with the photographer, Eva Verbeeck, to meet these farmers in order to show us how exceptionally important these people are in our lives, and what it’s like to find what you love!

Farming is more than just about growing some veggies or taking care of animals. As Spencer MacDonald gathered in the documentary — it’s about the past, your past, and the people who cultivated the land to make it possible for you to be here.

And this field doesn’t necessarily limit itself to people who are particularly earthy. Take this ex-professional football player, for example, who used his fortune to purchase a thousand acres of land in North Carolina and started farming without any past experience.

Check out what he’s doing with his crops in this short video from the “On The Road” series with Steve Hartman from CBS…

It seems that it’s about you being a part of this Earth.

But being a part of the Earth doesn’t necessarily mean having your hands deep in its soils.

Not all of us are going to be passionate about farming, and of course, that’s just fine! This world is wonderful mostly because there are people out there with a love for doing different things. What we hope you take from this article is that this world is absolutely packed with possibilities, and if you love something, there will be a place for you to do that out there somewhere, you just need to find it!

People like Spencer MacDonald are helping the world see just how amazing the simple things can be, and that things that we might see as simple could be much more spectacular to others.

I’ll leave you to think on this quote, from Australian Biologist, Bill Mollison:

“Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.”

Keep yourself open to new possibilities and happiness will stay nearby!

-Sam

If everyone was doing what they love, what kind of world could we live in?

Looking for more inspiration today?

Clicking on any of the articles down below can give you a dose of energy knowing that this world still has passionate people who care about making it a better place for every being that joins us, whether it’s through art, understanding or action. Take a look!

If you can’t decide on one, we have a nifty little “Surprise Me!” button that’ll bring you to an article that may have never been in your peripherals.

 

Notes:

  1. “Age of the Farmer.” Vimeo. Spencer MacDonald, 3 Nov. 2015. Web. 25 May 2017. <https://vimeo.com/144575429>.
  2. “Ex-NFL Star Finds New Passion in Farming.” YouTube. CBS Evening News, 14 Nov. 2014. Web. 6 June 2017. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOL2zTgweMs>.

Samantha Burns

Executive Assistant, Staff Writer

Samantha is a listener, creator, collector of knick knacks and lover of most, if not all, types of cheese.