As a part of our new Saturdays Around the World series of articles, today we take you on a little journey to an underworld most people will never see for themselves. But there are people who spend their Saturdays exploring strange and wonderful corners of our planet. In Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula, there is an incredible world hiding just below the forest floor…

The Yucatán is famous for its underwater caves, or cenote (pronounced say-NO-tay). These marvelous sinkholes, formed when the ceilings of massive underground cave systems collapse, are the entrances to incredible environments,  breathtaking natural wonders, like none other on earth.

For those who are just tuning in to our Saturdays Around the World series, this is a new adventure we are embarking on at EWC, to take you on small journeys, from the comfort of your home, on as many Saturdays as we can!  You probably know that our mission on this website is to prove that this is still an amazing world, despite what the negative, 24-hour news cycle tells us.

We think travel may be one of our most primal instincts, connecting us to our uniquely human sense of wonder. We have already traveled to Zadar, Croatia, so now let’s head to Mexico!

We start off above ground with Professor Brian Cox (one of Dr. Lynda’s favorite scientists), to get a feel for how these cave systems are created, and to check out some of their unique flora and fauna:

Via: BBC Earth 1

 Diving Deeper

Now, we have only begun to scratch the surface of the cenote, and it takes more than a snorkel to really explore their depths. Here is a beautifully filmed piece by YouTube traveler Mike Corey, diving deeper into the visual wonder of these caverns.

 Culture and History

The cenote are not just visually stunning.  They are also an integral part of the culture and history of the region.

For our last trip, we take you on a bit of a cultural journey with National Geographic, to the depths of a cenote also at the center of an archaeological site:

As a claustrophobe, I always find myself holding my breath as I watch people dive in caves, but the wonders they uncover there are truly remarkable. I love the idea that the incredible nature of our planet is not limited to the earth’s surface, and that we have the ability to explore these worlds. Sometimes our own planet can put into perspective how incredible life on the planet really is.

We hope to continue exploring this planet and taking you along with us on our Saturdays Around the World!  Explore the entire category by clicking the button below!

Saturday’s Around the World on EWC

Stay beautiful and keep laughing!

-Liesl

“Laughter is the shortest distance between two people.” – Victor Borge

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Or just scroll down to the bottom of this page where you’ll find a few more incredible articles like this one!

Notes:

  1. “Amazing Underwater Caves – Wonders of Life W/ Prof Brian Cox – BBC.”YouTube. BBC Earth, 15 July 2015. Web. 17 Nov. 2015. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnIGJpKkFyE>.
  2. Corey, Mike. “MEXICO: DEEP CAVE SCUBA DIVING IN THE PIT.” YouTube. Mike Corey, 28 Apr. 2015. Web. 17 Nov. 2015. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoGcGYci6CQ>.
  3. “Skulls Found in “Evil” Maya Sinkhole | National Geographic.” YouTube. NationalGeographic, 17 Jan. 2014. Web. 29 Aug. 2017. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVj3REMhDJ8>.

Liesl Ulrich-Verderber

COO Ever Widening Circles

Liesl is a camera-toting traveler, a global story seeker, and an aspiring—but more often floundering—yoga lover. She can be found on Instagram @Liesl.UV